Update on Google Encrypted Traffic: 8.875% of Google Traffic Now (Not Available)

Update on Google Encrypted Traffic: 8.875% of Google Traffic Now (Not Available)


Our last post on the impact of Google’s encrypted search change left us with data up to November 2nd and with an average of 6.5% of sites’ Google natural search traffic labeled (not provided.)  Since then, Rand Fishkin at SEOMoz published data showing sites surveyed had an average of 12% of Google natural search traffic (not provided) in the week of Nov. 4 – Nov. 10th. Brian Whalley at Hubspot recently updated that an average of 11.36% traffic was (not provided) for Hubspot customers.

Our original look was at 5 high traffic websites – 2 online retailers, 3 service providers – more than 1.7 million visits in total.  We updated the data to include up to Nov 20th and today, we are giving you a view both averaged week over week and day over day by website.

The percentage of traffic (not provided) grew from less than 1% in the week immediately after the launch, to 8.875% of traffic from Nov. 18-Nov. 20th (although not a full week.)

 

Looking at the five websites day over day, the site (site 5) with the most traffic lost to (not provided) peaked at 14% on November 17.  One of the five sites (site 2) lost consistently less traffic than the others, averaging 3.4% in the week between Nov. 14-Nov 20th, compared to a 10.84% for all other sites in the same time period.

 

Are you seeing things level off on your site?  Let us know in the comments below.  And, be sure to check out this great post by Avinash Kaushik on how to dive deeper into your (not provided) traffic to better determine the extent and sources of the traffic.

About Nathan Safran

Nathan is the Director of Research at Conductor and leads Conductor’s research and content team. Nathan is a monthly columnist at Search Engine Land and Search Engine Watch. Nathan’s research on digital marketing has been widely covered in both industry publications and mainstream media such as Techcrunch, Venture Beat and the Washington Post. Prior to joining Conductor, Nathan was an analyst at Forrester Research.

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